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The Real ‘Trick’ is in the ‘Treat’

3rd November 2019

Dear easipetcare friends,

It’s that time of year again for fancy dressing, serious feasting and ‘Trick or Treating’! And boy do we have some tasty treats lined up for your fur-friend(s)!

We’ll shine light on some toxic treats in disguise, but have no fear, we’ve also got a nice trick up our sleeves for you to whip up in the kitchen for your furry loved one(s) to enjoy! We think all of our doggy friends will love them as much as these hilarious greedy guts catching treats in these images, taken by German photographer Christian Vieler!

Dogs are especially well known for eating things that they aren’t supposed to; they give us those big puppy dog eyes and ‘Bon-A-pet-treat’ they’ve won us over in an instant! But a chomp too far and your jam-packed, chock-a-block pooch is in for a dangerous faux-paw! But to put your minds at rest and keep your precious pets in safe hands, here is a list of treats that are best kept for us humans:

Nuts

Like witches there are good nuts and bad nuts but we recommend not letting your mutt go nuts on either! Without getting too nutty about it, it’s worth bearing in mind that nut allergies do exist in dogs and they also pose a possible chocking risk to smaller pets! Bad nuts – almonds, walnuts, macadamia, pecans, pistachios & hickory Good nuts – peanuts, cashews & hazelnuts

Grapes & Raisins

These lunchbox favourites are well documented to have a high toxicity for dogs, though research has yet to pinpoint exactly which substance in the fruit causes the reaction! So since there is no proven amount that is safe, prevention really is the best medicine when it comes to slipping your dog a few of these! Because these innocent looking snacks are real witches in disguise!

Milk & Dairy

It might be tempting to share your ice cream during your evening in front of the fire but don’t be fooled, milk and dairy products can cause diarrhoea and other digestive problems for your dog. Instead we recommend giving your pupsicle an ice cube to munch on!

Chocolate

As all pet owners know, milk and dark chocolate (especially dark), are toxic to the pooch you are passionate about. It’s the theobromine contained within the Cocoa bean, which makes your pet poorly. The Cocoa bean gives chocolate its colour and taste – the darker the chocolate the greater the amount of theobromine. So what about white chocolate? Un-fur-tunatley that’s witch-ful thinking too! According to the RSPCA, chocolate poisoning is the most commonly reported dog poisoning. Find out more about the dangers of chocolate here on our blog: Chocoholic Dogs Anonymous

DIY dog treats

But enough of the dark side! How about this for some pawsome fun – get barking – whoops – baking for the pooch you want to treat!

The Dogs Trust have kindly barked up their version of Apple and Cinnamon Twists. These tasty treats are totally dog friendly and will most certainly get the woof factor vote from both pooches and their owners. Probably best to munch a few yourself – to make sure they’re cooked of course! We don’t want any saggy tails! 🙂

SHOPPING LIST
240g oat flour
80g rolled oats
1 egg
5 eating apples
Pinch of cinnamon

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Preheat the oven to 350F/175C. Line a baking tray with grease proof paper.
2. Beat the egg
3. Peel and dice the apples, add half a cup of water, stew the apple until very soft. Take care to remove all the pips please – woofers don’t like them.
4. Mix the apple sauce, oat flour, oats and cinnamon in a bowl, pour about half the beaten egg over the mixture.
5. Stir into a dough with a wooden spoon.
6. Take a golf ball size of the dough and roll into a stick (about 10 inches long) then twist the stick into whatever shape your pooch fancies!
7. Place onto the baking tray and brush with the remaining egg.
8. Bake for 25-30 mins until golden brown.
9. Allow to cool

Now all you tip top gorgeous pooches – don’t woof them down all at once, otherwise you won’t want your tea!

Best wishes,

Judy.xxx

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